Christian Mythology for Kids

I bought this book for my daughter, who is now almost 11 months old and not yet old enough to appreciate it. However, I have benefited from it enough to make the purchase worthwhile even if she never reads it.

christianmythologyforkidsThe concept behind this book is to introduce kids in secular families to the Christian stories without exposing them to the dogmatic and ham-fisted fundamentalist/evangelical interpretations of those stories. But this book is not just for kids. Going back and rereading the stories as an ex-Christian has been incredibly entertaining and therapeutic. And not only does it go into the Biblical stories but it also tells the extra-Biblical traditional stories about the fall of Lucifer from heaven before the creation of the world and it explains the ideas of heaven and hell  (and purgatory and limbo) and the final judgement. Ideas that are so clearly mythological, but when you have been indoctrinated with them from early in your life it can be hard to see that.

The book has also reminded me of some old stories that I’d almost completely forgotten. One of my favorites is Jonah and the Whale. So much of the fundamentalist interpretation is wrapped up making apologetics for the notion that a man could survive inside a fish — for three days no less — that the myth is ruined. Seriously, trying to interpret a myth as actual history ruins it! When you look at this story as a fable, clearly there was someone (who knows who) who was trying to expand the idea of God’s concern to the people of Nineveh — the capital city of the empire that had swallowed and scattered the people of Israel and Judah. Before this story the enemies of Israel were usually just destroyed wholesale. Here, Jonah is told by God to go to Nineveh and warn them that they have displeased God and they will be destroyed if they don’t repent of their ways. Jonah hates the Ninevites and does not want to do it and tries to run away to sea and this is where that side story about the fish/whale comes in. Jonah finally learns he can’t run from God and ends up being a street preacher in Nineveh for a few days. Forget the impossibility of Jonah surviving being eaten by a fish. How about an entire empire capital city listening seriously to the crazy ramblings of the “end is near” guy? #thisneverhappens Anyway… since they do repent God does not send the promised calamity and Jonah is pissed. He wanted to see some punishment! Ah, poor bigoted Jonah.

Reading these old stories as myths and not stuffing them into a literal historical interpretation (or as a supposed foreshadowing of the future coming of Jesus) has been very beneficial to me as an ex-Christian. The book also has a beautiful illustrations. I highly recommend it.

One thought on “Christian Mythology for Kids

  1. I wish this book had been around when my kids were little. We did have D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths for them, which is also beautifully illustrated, and gave the kids a good grounding in Greek mythology, so they could have that as a basis for comparison when they heard Xian myths.

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